Human bone marrow: immunohistochemical staining for CD71. Note membrane staining of erythroid progenitor cells. CD71: clone 10F11

CD71

cd71

Antigen Background

The CD71 molecule is a type II membrane glycoprotein with a molecular weight of approximately 180 kD. It is known as the transferrin receptor and is composed of two disulfide-bonded 90 kD subunits. The CD71 molecule plays a critical role in cell proliferation by controlling the supply of iron, an essential component for many metabolic pathways, through the binding and endocytosis of transferrin, the major iron-carrying protein. CD71 protein is reported to be expressed on activated B and T cells, macrophages, proliferating cells and metabolically active cells, for example, neurons.

Disclaimer

CD71 is recommended for the detection of specific antigens of interest in normal and neoplastic tissues, as an adjunct to conventional histopathology using non-immunologic histochemical stains.

  • This item replaces CD71-309-L-UCD71-309-U
    CD71-309-L-CE
    1ml NCL-L-CD71-309
    10F11
    Liquid Concentrate
    P (HIER)

Product Specifications

Product Specifications

CD71-309-L-CE
Specialized
10F11
Liquid Concentrate
No
P (HIER)
Mono
Mouse
In Vitro Diagnostic Use
1ml

Documents

Documents

CD71-309-L-CE

Resources

Resources

Antigen Background

The CD71 molecule is a type II membrane glycoprotein with a molecular weight of approximately 180 kD. It is known as the transferrin receptor and is composed of two disulfide-bonded 90 kD subunits. The CD71 molecule plays a critical role in cell proliferation by controlling the supply of iron, an essential component for many metabolic pathways, through the binding and endocytosis of transferrin, the major iron-carrying protein. CD71 protein is reported to be expressed on activated B and T cells, macrophages, proliferating cells and metabolically active cells, for example, neurons.

Disclaimer

CD71 is recommended for the detection of specific antigens of interest in normal and neoplastic tissues, as an adjunct to conventional histopathology using non-immunologic histochemical stains.

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